Copyright » Copyright Office http://copyright.laws.com Copyright- Copyright Law, Copyright Symbol, US Copyright Office, Copyright Infringement Thu, 29 Sep 2016 15:43:41 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.1.18 Library of Congress Copyright http://copyright.laws.com/copyright-office/library-of-congress-copyright http://copyright.laws.com/copyright-office/library-of-congress-copyright#comments Sat, 04 Apr 2015 12:17:04 +0000
What is the Library of Congress?
 
 
The Library of Congress is the official research library of the United States Congress. In regards to shelf space and the number of books, the Library of Congress is the largest library in the world. Located in Washington D.C., the building stands as the oldest federal cultural institution in the United States.
The Library of Congress was constructed in 1800 and housed in the United States Capital for the majority of the 19th century. Following the War of 1812, a vast majority of the library’s documents and books were destroyed; however, following a number of donations, most notably by Thomas Jefferson, to restore the Library of Congress’s collection of works.
The Library of Congress’s primary mission is researching inquiries made by members of Congress through the Congressional Research Service. Although the Library of Congress is open to the public, only Members of the United States’ Congress, Supreme Court Justices and other high-ranking government’s officials may check out books or resources.
The Library of Congress is regarded as the de facto national library, and as such, promotes literacy and American literature through a number of projects and government-funded initiatives. In addition to housing numerous resources, government documents and works of literature, the Library of Congress also enables creators of art to formally register their works with the United States Government.
Library of Congress Copyright Explained:
 
 
Copyright laws are designed to protect the creator of intellectual works (musical recordings, drawings, paintings, sculptures, movies etc.) from duplication or distribution. That being said, it is not necessary to register such works with the Library of Congress to be protected, for the creator of any work holds the copyright the moment a work is put in a fixed form, such as recorded or on a piece of paper.
Although a tangible creation carries an inherent form of protection, a Library of Congress Copyright solidifies the work as the individual’s and affirms protection through a government intermediary. Additionally, once an individual registers for a Library of Congress Copyright, the work is placed in a database. This system will ensure that the work, along with its intricacies, will be free from duplication.
Obtaining a Library of Congress copyright provides the creator with a certificate of registration; this registration is proof of the copyright and officially becomes a matter of public record. This tangible document will become useful if any questions of plagiarism arise in future litigations.
This benefit cannot be understated; the obtainment of a Library of Congress Copyright will expedite any Copyright Infringement filing or case that an individual may file in the future.
How do I obtain a Library of Congress Copyright?
 
 
To register for a Library of Congress Copyright, an individual must fill out a form CO and pay the required filing fees. The Library of Congress Copyright form may be filed as a hard copy ($50 filing fee) or online at the Copyright Office Website ($35 filing fee).
In addition to the filing fees, you must also provide a nonreturnable copy of the work to be deposited in the copyright office—the work must be made tangible on paper or as a recording for music (sheet music is also acceptable).
All information provided to the copyright office will become a matter of public record. Once you have officially received the certificate for the Library of Congress Copyright the work will be protected for your life plus an additional 70 years after death. It is suggested that before you apply for a Library of Congress Copyright you utilize a copyright search to see if your work is already registered with the Copyright Office or the Library of Congress.

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Discover How to Find a Copyright http://copyright.laws.com/copyright-office/finding-a-copyright http://copyright.laws.com/copyright-office/finding-a-copyright#comments Sat, 04 Apr 2015 12:16:08 +0000
Copyright office records are all available to the public. The Register of Copyrights is required to make all records of deposits, registrations, recordations, and other actions accessible through a copyright search. Indexes, copyrights and any other information obtained by the Copyright Office is readily available for public inspection.
Public people may conduct their own search by using the copyright search website. Any records put on file by the Copyright Office since 1978 can be found using the copyright search engine on the official United States copyright page: copyright.gov. Works and information put on file before 1978 are located in the Library of Congress. The Copyright Office can help locate older files that are not located on the copyright search engine.
Upon request and the payment of a fee, the Copyright Office will conduct a search and provide materials to anyone who makes such a request. If someone chooses to conduct their own copyright search on the copyright web page, they may do so for free. The search engine is set up so finding copyrights will be easy. There are options that allow someone to search for a copyright by:
    Title;
    Name;
    Keywords;
    Registration Number;
    Document Number; or
    Command Keyword.
Anyone familiar with web searches should have no problem searching and finding the copyright information they desire. Information that may be included once the correct copyright page has been reached on the search engine is:
    The relevance the copyright still currently holds.
    The registration number and date.
    The title (a song’s name for example).
    Where it appears (Song "A" appears in music album titled "B").
    Description (Sound recording, book, image, etc.).
    Date of creation.
    Performer, author, artist.
    Claimants.
    Basis of claim (New words added to a song, new directions added to a manual, new audiovisual material).
    Previous registrations, if any.
    All names involved in copyright ownership.
Once results have popped up on the copyright page, users can sort through the thousands of copyright search results and organize them by relevance, date (descending or ascending), name, or full title.

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Understanding Retention of Articles http://copyright.laws.com/copyright-office/retention-of-articles http://copyright.laws.com/copyright-office/retention-of-articles#comments Sat, 04 Apr 2015 12:16:08 +0000
All works--including  literary works, identifying materials, and other materials--deposited into the Copyright Office becomes the property of the United States Government. Even materials that have been refused registration remain the property of the United States Government. Any published phonorecords, copies and other identifiable material deposited to the Register of Copyright are to be available to the Library of Congress' collections. They are also available to be transferred to another library.
Unpublished works deposited to the Register of Copyright are available to be sent to any collection deposits or for transfer to the National Archives of the United States or to a Federal records center.
Any work submitted to the Register of Copyrights can be subject to an exact reproduction of part or all of the material submitted. The Register of Copyrights can keep the replica in their depository for as long as desired. The reproduction is then transported to the Library of Congress before it is decided if the material will be kept in the depository or destroyed.
Any works not selected to remain in the Library of Congress may be stored in the Copyright Office depository for the longest practical amount of time. No unpublished work shall be destroyed during its term of copyright unless an exact replica exists and the Copyright Office will have access to the replica. Items are held in storage for filing and statistical purposes.
A creator may request the Copyright Office's retention of a work for the full duration of its copyright term. The Register of Copyrights shall determine and regulate which requests are granted to creators. If a retention is granted, the creator must pay the retention fee.

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Knowing the Responsibilities and Organization of the Copyright Office http://copyright.laws.com/copyright-office/ http://copyright.laws.com/copyright-office/#comments Sat, 04 Apr 2015 12:16:08 +0000

The responsibilities and organization of the Copyright Office are handled by the Register of Copyrights. The Register of Copyrights and all its employees and officers are appointed by the Library of Congress. They serve the Library of Congress and act under their supervision and direction.

Duties of the Register of Copyrights include:

Advise Congress on national and international copyright manners.

Advise and assist Federal agencies and the judiciary on copyright issues both national and international.

Travel to conferences in which the governments of foreign nations take part in handling issues regarding copyright and other related matters. This helps copyrighted works remain protected internationally. The Register of Copyrights may act on copyright issues with the permission of the executive branch.

Take part in studies and research regarding copyright issues and any other functions of the Copyright Office. They are to discuss intellectual property rules and regulations with foreign nations as well.

Perform additional duties upon request from the United States Congress. They must provide a seal on all certified copyrighted documents that pass through the Copyright Office, effective January 1st, 1978.

Send a report detailing accomplishments and other work completed within the last fiscal year to the Librarian of Congress. The Register of Copyrights will have its own report separate from the report for the Copyright Office.

Register of Copyrights Organization

Any regulations set in place by the Register of Copyrights under the Copyright Office umbrella must be approved by the Librarian of Congress.

All acts of the Copyright Office are recorded and may be subject to provisions according to the Administrative Procedure Act of June 11, 1946.

Rates of pay for registers of copyright shall be determined by the executive schedule. Only four people shall be given the position of Associate Registers of Copyrights by the Library of Copyrights.


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Quick Glance At The Background of Copyright Office http://copyright.laws.com/copyright-office/background-copyright-office http://copyright.laws.com/copyright-office/background-copyright-office#comments Sat, 04 Apr 2015 12:16:07 +0000
The Copyright Office is a part of the Library of Congress in the United States Government. The main function of the United States Copyright Office is to maintain records of copyright registration. Copyright records show who is the original creator of copyrighted works.
If someone owns the copyright to a work, they are entitled to the benefits that may arise from that copyrighted work. The Copyright Office clearly states ownership of works once they have copyrighted them. The Register of Copyrights is the head of the Copyright Office. The first Register of Copyrights was Thorvald Solberg in 1870, and the current Register of Copyrights, Marybeth Peters, has been in office since 1994. The United States Copyright Office is located in the James Madison Memorial Building of the Library of Congress in Washington D.C.
The mission of the United States Copyright Office is to promote new ideas and creativity. Anyone is capable of creating a work that is unique and could have the ability to benefit society in some way, whether it be for audio and visual stimulation or a practical educational use.
The Copyright Office consults with members of the Office as well as lawmakers and public people to create and certify copyrights. They look to protect creators and make sure no one infringes on their creativity. The Copyright Office is not an organization out to create as much profit as possible, but rather they only use fees to raise money to maintain necessary production costs.
The creativity of the American people has helped make the Library of Congress the largest national library in America. It has a collection of more than 126 million books, computer programs, artworks, sound recordings, and many other copyrighted material. The Copyright Office is one of the most important aspects of creativity and ownership existing in the United States.

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How Are Copyright Fees Determined http://copyright.laws.com/copyright-office/copyright-fees http://copyright.laws.com/copyright-office/copyright-fees#comments Sat, 04 Apr 2015 12:16:07 +0000
Copyright Office fees are to be paid to the Register of Copyrights. Forms that require a fee are any forms pertaining to registration. 
Determining Copyright Fees
The Register of Copyrights has the right to adjust the fees of any service they provide. The Register of Copyrights conducts studies to determine the production costs of documents to make claims and hand out other requested forms. The Register of Copyrights uses the budget and considers public demand when determining proper copyright fees. 
The Register of Copyright does not have the authority to raise fees higher than a level necessary to cover production costs in addition to adjusting rates for inflation. Fees are rounded off to the nearest dollar, or for fees less than $12, to the nearest 50 cents. The Register of Copyright is to remain fair when determining a fee and consider the objectives of the copyright system.
If the Copyright Office's study shows copyright fees should be raised, the Register of Copyrights must submit a fee schedule to Congress. The fee schedule is to include a total economic analysis that led to the determination that the rate of fees should be raised. If Congress grants the fee raise, it will be enforced no sooner than 120 days from the day the request was filed. Within those 120 days, Congress may pass their own law denying the Copyright Office from raising fees.
While the Register of Copyrights is not free to raise copyright fees without permission from Congress, they have the right to waive any fees especially if the fee is a relatively small amount. Copyright fees paid go directly into the United States Treasury and are held to help fund the needs of the Treasury. There is no time limit on how long money from the Copyright Office can remain in the Treasury. The Copyright Office has the right to refund any fees paid that were paid by mistake or through error on behalf of any party.
Excess money that the Copyright Office is entitled to may be placed into securities and invested by the United States Treasury. Any income earned from investments will go toward funding future necessary expenses the Copyright Office may incur.

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Quick Overview of Copyright Office Forms http://copyright.laws.com/copyright-office/copyright-office-forms http://copyright.laws.com/copyright-office/copyright-office-forms#comments Sat, 04 Apr 2015 12:16:07 +0000
All copyright forms are public and can be made available upon request. Copyright records and indexes are available for free. Alternatively, a fee can be charged to cover the cost of production. Any records held by the copyright office are to be held and distributed based on the rules and regulations followed by the Copyright Office. These public copyright forms and indexes are available for inspection by the public.
Catalog of Copyright Entries
The Copyright Office periodically publishes catalogs of all copyright entries. The catalogs are organized based on what type of work is being copyrighted and the function it may serve. The Copyright Office formulates its own opinion on what information should be published regarding each copyright registration. Practicality and usefulness are two of the main factors examined to determine how much and what specific information will be published for each copyright registration.
Other Forms
The Copyright Office must furnish all copyright forms requesting a copyright for a work as well as any forms explaining the functions and any other general information pertaining to the Copyright Office. The Copyright Office has the power and authority to publish any other information such as indexes, bibliographies and any other material that may be of value to the public.
Distribution of Publications
All publications made by the Copyright Office are sent to depository libraries. Any copyright forms that are not free may be made available to the public to purchase for a fee to cover the cost of production.


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What You Need to Know About US Copyright Office http://copyright.laws.com/copyright-office http://copyright.laws.com/copyright-office#comments Sat, 04 Apr 2015 12:16:07 +0000

The US Copyright Office is where all records regarding copyright ownership are held and made available to the public. A copyright on an original work gives the creator of that work the right to any benefits that arise from being the creator, whether it be financial or for respect and reputation.

The Copyright Office makes paperwork available to the public for a fee and the filing of necessary paperwork will certify that a work is registered and copyrighted. The US Copyright Office has the right to publish any information regarding a copyrighted work including who created it, when it was created and what purpose it serves. Paperwork can be filed to renew a copyright. The Copyright Office also has the right to deny any work of being copyrighted if they feel just.

The Copyright Office consults with the United States Congress on legal and financial matters. The Copyright Office, in conjunction with Congress, looks for ways to best serve the public and create new ideas, creativity and productivity. All copyrighted works and works that are not copyrighted but submitted to the US Copyright Office become the property of the Library of Congress and the Library may hold onto the copyrighted work as long as desired. Even though the work is physically in the possession of the Copyright Office, the copyright belongs to the creator of the work. If you need legal advice and assistance, contact copyright lawyers.

The Copyright Office is a part of the Library of Congress in the United States Government. The Register of Copyrights is the head of the Copyright Office. The first Head Registry was Thorvald Solberg in 1870. Currently, Marybeth Peters is the head of Copyright Registry and has been since 1994. All material deposited to the Copyright Office is stored in the James Madison Memorial Building of the Library of Congress in Washington D.C.

The mission of the US Copyright Office is to promote new ideas and functions through creativity by the United States public. The Copyright Office looks to ensure all those that create an original work receive the proper credit for creating such a work. Since the Library began storing copyrighted material in 1870, there have been over 126 million original works stored in the Library of Congress. The original works include books, computer programs, artwork, sound recordings, and any other creations issued a copyright.

The Register of Copyrights handles the Copyright Office's responsibilities and organization. Employees of the Copyright Office are appointed by the Library of Congress and serve under the direct supervision on the United States Congress. Copyright Office employees are expected to communicate with international representatives to determine copyright rules and regulations that can be agreed upon internationally.

Information can travel so quickly in this age, and thus, copyright protection needs to extend beyond the United States. Uniform rules are the best way to insure creators receive proper credit for their work. The Copyright Office advises Congress on what changes should be made to current copyright law.

The Copyright Office is also responsible for conducting studies to determine how effective the Office is running. Any changes to the function or organization of the Office must be submitted to and approved by Congress. All accomplishments and details of other work completed must be submitted to Congress each fiscal year.

All works deposited into the Copyright Office, such as phonorecords, literary works, identifying material, and other material, becomes the property of the United States Government. If a work is refused registration into the Copyright Office it still may be retained for a certain amount of time. Works that are published and copyrighted will be sent to the Library of Congress. where they will remain.

Unpublished works deposited to the Register of Copyrights are available to be sent to any collection deposits or for transfer to the National Archives of the United States or to a Federal records center. They may also be discarded.

The Register of Copyrights has the right to create an exact replica of any work submitted to it. Once the replica is made, it can either be stored permanently in the Library of Congress or discarded. Works that are discarded or destroyed will first remain in a depository for statistical and informational purposes until they are ready to be discarded or destroyed.

Copyright Office Forms

Copyright Office fees are paid directly to the Register of Copyrights. Forms that require a fee are any forms pertaining to registration, registration for a copyright, classification of copyright forms, corrections or adjustments to the copyrighted work, first time publishing, rules and regulations for a copyrighted work, and requests to file an untimely application to claim an infringement was made against a work.

Fees can be requested for certification of copyrights as well as copyright renewals. Any paperwork requested pertaining to information regarding Copyright Office functions or details regarding copyrighted work could come with a fee. Receipts and any paperwork that is to be filed by the Register of Copyrights may also come with a charge. Fees are rounded off to the nearest dollar, or in the case of fees under $12, to the nearest 50 cents.

Any increase in fees must be requested to Congress. A written fee schedule must be submitted to Congress and, if approved, the fee increase will take place 120 days after the request has been filed. Congress has the right to deny a fee increase. Fee increases may only be made to cover production costs and adjust for inflation. Estimated production costs are acquired after the Copyright Office conducts studies to determine if form fees need to be raised.

Any money raised will be deposited into the United States Treasury and invested into a security. Income from the investment will go toward production costs and improvements to the Copyright Office. There is no set amount of time by which the Copyright Office must spend the deposited money.

All US Copyright Office documents are available for public inspection. For a fee, the Copyright Office can conduct a search and provide forms containing information about the copyright. If a public person chooses to use the Copyright Office's website to conduct a search, they may do so for free. 

All copyrights granted after 1978 have been placed into the copyright search engine. Online, someone can search for a copyright by searching the name, title, keyword, registration number, or use command keywords. The search engine brings up thousands of results for each search and users can sort the results by relevance, date (descending or ascending), name, or full title. 


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